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20121112
20121120
STATION
CSPAN2 7
CSPAN 6
CNNW 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
not often >> ronald reagan. "social security has nothing to do with the deficit. social security is totally funded by the payroll taxes levied on employer and employee. if you reduce the social security, that money would not go into the general fund to reduce the deficit." ronald reagan. >> texas congressmember and former republican presidential candidate ron paul has given his farewell speech to the house of representatives. and more than 45 minute address wednesday, he assessed his own legacy, blasted u.s. policy at home and abroad and posed a series of questions. >> why cannot people understand that were always destroys wealth and the ready? why is there so little concern for the executive order that gives the president authority to establish a kill list, including american citizens, of those targeted for assassination. why is patriotism thought to be blind loyalty to the government and the politicians to run it, rather than loyalty to the principles of liberty and support for the people. real patriotism is a willingness to challenge the government when it is wrong. >> congressmember ron
it is early in the book. things happen that don't prevent so they do change the politics who ronald reagan will clearly run for governor and beats pat brown who also beat the knicks and. >> so in effect it comes out of nowhere. progressivism with the turmoil of the night of course, we've no the turmoil of the great depression and obamacare comes out of the great recession. where in the world does the great society come from? and as a kid seven years old i remember 64 we went around the neighborhood to win the war of 1964. it is my awakening. how it is a sense something important happened but one could not predict the revolution and social policy of the great society. the sheer wealth of america, could you talk about that? >> guest: the economy growing nonstop since 1961 and was absolutely powerful. with a steam engine in. i once wrote a book called grand expectations that covers this period. this was the time and johnson was not nothing if not grandiose. not much of a speaker but on top of everything. people contrast did two obama. when you talk about the way johnson managed congress never
't prevent him from getting things done but do change the public's so by the end of the year ronald reagan is running and as you point out in 19661 beat pet brown who four years later beat nixon. >> guest: >> host: what i find amazing is that it comes out of nowhere. there is no predicate. the progressives even come out of the turmoil in 1890. of course we know the new deal comes out of the turmoil in the great depression and we can even argue that obamacare comes out of the great recession. where in the world as the great society come from? and i and you answered that question and when i was a kid in this period 7-years-old pocketful in 64 we went in and around the neighborhood we won the war of 1964 and this is about the election. for that kind of way one could not have predicted the revolution and social policy that became the great society and your answer for that seems to be the sheer wealth of america. could you talk about that? >> the economy had been growing nonstop since 1961, and it was absolutely powerful moving ahead like a steam engine in '64 and '65. they had trouble in late
. >> the statistics that you can present to you is that when ronald reagan ran for reelection in 1984, similar situation come here to raise money for his primary and the party even though he took the public general election funding, he attended for fundraisers in that year. what are we doing where we have a president running around? as i recall, the nevada event that romney hit import into the rushing off after libya was a fundraiser. a fourth of his time in office is this election year and a spinning it at fundraisers. and romney is getting videotaped at his fundraisers talking about the 47% in a private, closed room with people, that's what they want to hear and that's who he is meeting with all the time. so this is a problem for i think both sides, and we're going to see that pressure, the money pressure in the house and senate races. >> we'll have a minute left but i would love to hear if there is action of some sort taken to compel disclosure or to higher degree of independence or whatever steps, measures you face. conjure a vision of the future two, three, four cycles down the road what
intellect or exercise in ideology. i covered ronald reagan for six years. and if you want to discuss it some more, i can tell what you i learned in those six years of covering the presidency. it with a lot different than than what i thought it was going to be. it became clear to me that to a large degree, it is a test of the president's will and purpose. to believe in a few big things, to stand steady against the swirl of political controversy, opinion, nowadays, that's certainly not true for the presidents in this book. polls, advice from counselors, all kinds of things that would drive a president away from his core convictions to not necessarily do what he believed in or what he really believed to be best for the country. this is a book about character, about 16 presidents from george washington to george w. bush who all in a moment of national crisis did what they in their hearts believe was the right thing for the country, who showed character. not necessarily what turned out to be right. think there's some decisions they made that i don't know i agree with. and you can certainly argue
by the end of the year ronald reagan is clearly going to run for governor, as you point out in 1966, and does, and beats pat brown, who four years earlier had beaten nixon in the race for governor. >> host: what i always found most amaze about the great society in effect it comes out of nowhere. there's no predicate for it. we know the new deal comes out of the turmoil of the great depression. you can even argue that obamacare -- we can call it that -- obamacare comes oust the great recession. where in the world does the great society come from? i think you answer that question, and it's -- i was a kid during this period, and seven years old, in 1965, and i remember in '64, we went around the neighborhood, all-black communities, saying, we won the war of 196 4. and this was about the election of lbj. and it was a sense that something important happened. but one could not predict the revolution in social policy that became the great society. and your answer for all that seems to be -- it's the sheer wealth of america. is it -- cue talk about that? >> guest: yes. the economy had been growing no
to make a comment about this benghazi thing. republicans have made such a big deal out of it. ronald reagan sent over 200 marines to their death and there was no public outrage. where is the republican outrage? only because of obama do we get this kind of reaction. thank you. host: edward, from miami, florida, this morning. another editorial, from being west, former infantryman. host: that is from the former assistant secretary of defense. we're taking your calls on this issue. b.j., good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, who is joe kelly? why would brought well be sending her threatening e-mails? -- broadwell be sending her a threat in e-mails? host: do you think the senate needs to hold a hearing on this? caller: absolutely. i look forward to his testimony under oath this time, rather than giving the cock and bull story from before. it is all because of the video tape. now he cannot be blackmailed by anyone. host: joe kelly is described as a 37-year-old social liaison at the air force base in tampa. host: did he have an affair with her? is that when he was so upset? --
in washington at the ronald reagan building. so i'm leaving. you'll wrap things up for us. >> i'll hold down the fort, but only while you're gone. >> you'll do an excellent job. we'll have much more of what's going on, including my interview with senator dianne feinstein. she's got a lot to say on this whole scandal. and it sounds to her like it's something out of the national enquirer. something very interesn common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show megapixels place to sleep little roadster war and peace deep sea diving ninja app hipster glasses 5% cash back sign up to get 5% everywhere online through december. only from discover. >>> the affair that brought down cia director david petraeus caught most officials in the nation's capital by surprise. and many of us by surprise. and they're finding general john allen's connecti
george bush was for september 11 or that ronald reagan was with the blowing up of the u.s. marine in beirut. >> brian: was there conflict -- put it this way, let's compare what george bush did, the administration knew and what we found out on 9-11 compared to what we fine out in 9-11, 2012. within 24 hours we knew who did it. within a week or so we found out we were mobilizing against it. no one was in conflict about who did the crime. no one said this was an internal attack, the towers fell down by themselves or an outrageous protest about our middle east policy. there was a movement together to get answers together where you had a movement that was totally fractured and a president who wouldn't answer any questions before the campaign. >> eric: let's take a couple months back, this was september 10, september 9, 8. remember we were talking president obama campaigning, instead of staying in the oval office getting intel briefings. remember, he houston, texas been to an intel briefing in months. everyone said don't worry action he'll get it on air force one or wherever he is. no.
% interest rates gas lines, stagflation in 1888 different president. ronald reagan inherited a struggling economy. and reagan implemented policies 180 degrees opposite those of obama. incentive jacking up taxes, he slashed taxes. instead of exploding spending on the debt, he restrain the growth of spending and instead of unleashing the the regulators, by the way, what i think the regulators i can't help think of mr. burns saying release the hounds. [laughter] instead of releasing the hounds of regulators and small businesses a notch when there is, reagan limited regulation and the result was one of the most extraordinary burst of economic proactivity our nation has ever seen. the fourth-year regulation precisely corresponds to write here, the fourth year of obama's president be. anyone know what gdp growth was in 1984? 7.2%. our ideas work, their ideas don't. if you want growth, if you want jobs, if you want 23 million people struggling to find to get jobs, the answer is that the unique growth. they simplify the tax burden, reduce regulations and punching small businesses a notch for view
this benghazi thing. republicans have made such a big deal out of it. ronald reagan sent over 200 marines to their death and there was no public outrage. where is the republican outrage? only because of obama do we get this kind of reaction. thank you. host: edward, from miami, florida, this morning. another editorial, from being west, former infantryman. host: that is from the former assistant secretary of defense. we're taking your calls on this issue. b.j., good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, who is joe kelly? why would broadwell be sending her a threat in emails? host: do you think the senate needs to hold a hearing on this? caller: absolutely. i look forward to his testimony under oath this time, rather than giving the cock and bull story from before. it is all because of the video tape. now he cannot be blackmailed by anyone. host: joe kelly is described as a 37-year-old social liaison at the air force base in tampa. caller: did he have an affair with her? is that why he was so upset? host: you think these questions need to be looked up by congress? caller: i do not
. bill bradley and i started with the first bill on this, and then ronald reagan picked it up and really carried at, and we got it done in a bipartisan way. when we did our original bill, we took out a mortgage deduction, we took out the charitable deduction, we took out everything, and we got right down to christie, it was 10%, 50%, 25% was the top rate, and we thought it was an elegant bill, but it could not pass muster political. we had all the real estate people and all the mortgage bankers and everybody came to town and said you get rid of the mortgage interest deduction is the end of the world, so we lost that. and all the university presidents and all the priests and all the other charities came and said you cannot get rid of that. the only thing we call on to was state and local income tax, and how we hang -- hung on to that i would never know. in the end, we were able to lower individual rates by taking more money from the corporate side, which i do not think you can do now. everybody is saying that corporate rate is too high in america, said to be competitive we have to get at
examples of presidents who solved big problems by finding common ground with the other side. ronald reagan did it with a democratic-led house after a far more resounding second-term victory than president obama's, as did bill clinton, with a republican-controlled house and a republican-controlled senate after a more resounding second-term victory than president obama. both examples -- both of them -- illustrate the rare opportunity that divided government presents. president obama can follow suit or he can take the extremist view that both reagan and clinton rejected, by thumbing his nose at the other side and insisting that if republicans aren't willing to do things his way, he won't do anything at all. now, if the president's serious, he'll follow the leads of president reagan and clinton. if he's really serious, he'll put the campaign rhetoric aside, propose a realistic solution that can pass a republican-controlled house and a divided senate, and work to get it done. and if the president acts in this spirit, i have no doubt he'll have the support of his own party and a willing partner
, stagflation. in 1980, a very, very different president got elected. ronald reagan like barack obama inherited a struggling economy. and reagan implemented policies 180 degrees opposite those of obama. instead of jacking up taxes, he slashed taxes. instead of exploding spending and the debt, he restrained the growth of spending and instead of unleashing the hounds of regulators, by the way, when i think of regulators, i can't help thinking of mr. burns saying "release the hounds!" [laughter] >> instead of releasing the hounds of regulators on small businesses and entrepreneurs, reagan limited regulation and the result was one of the most extraordinary bursts of economic productivity our nation has ever seen. the fourth year of reagan's presidency was 1984, the same as the fourth year of obama's presidency. anyone know what g.d.p. growth was in 1984, 7.2%. our ideas work. their ideas don't. if you want growth, if you want jobs. if you want the 23 million people struggling to find work to get jobs, the answer is simple. you need growth and to get growth, you got to reduce and simplify the tax bu
's policy with ronald reagan. what advice would you give the president. guest: i would say three things. mr. president you won, be strong and mr. president go for broke. deal from strength. you're never going to have to run for reelection so go to the wall on every issue you believe in. host: including entitlement and social security. guest: i don't know what you mean by entitlement reform if you mean fixing them that's what president obama believes, yes, yes yes. and i would say there were some issues in the first term where i was disappointed. let's take climate change president obama didn't go up to congress and fight for a strong bill. now the white house will tell you we didn't do it because we didn't have the votes. to me that's giving up before you fight the fight. i think on climate change and immigration reform and entitlement reform on this fiscal cliff on the tax break for 98% of meshes, on a balanced approach to fixing our fiscal crisis the president has to go up there and fight every fight. have steel in his backbone this time and i think he'll have a legendary second four year
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)